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6 Things to Know About Personalized Nutrition

Personalized Nutrition
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Personalized nutrition is fast replacing generic health and wellness recommendations, as Today’s Dietitian reports.

Working from the concept that individual dietary, exercise and lifestyle choices can create different nutritional needs even among people with many demographics in common, personalized nutrition has the potential to enhance life quality and longevity.

In this article, learn six key things you need to know about personalized nutrition.

  1. Nutrigenomics is a key to success with personalized nutrition plans.

Nutrition DNA testing, or nutrigenomics as it is called in the field, is fast becoming the gold standard for personalized nutrition plans, as Scientific American explains.

This is based on a ground-breaking study of pairs of identical and non-identical twins called PREDICT. The study showed that even people with identical genes could respond differently to the same exact diet.

  1. Personalized nutrition is not a fad or passing trend.

Today’s fad diet will likely be piled up on tomorrow’s clearance aisle. Personalized nutrition is not a quick fix or a fad diet, nor is it a passing trend. It is the dietetics of the future, thanks to the sequencing of the human genome.

However, how personalized nutrition is administered is changing rapidly. From studies into the gut microbiome to the nutrigenetics advances mentioned previously here, it is important that your personalized nutrition plan is science-based.

  1. Some aspects of personalized nutrition still remain the same for all.

Even as advances in science and research unlock clues about why different bodies process certain foods differently, some aspects of nutrition science apply universally.

A good example is to stay hydrated. All bodies need adequate intake of fresh, clean, plain water every day no matter what is going on in the gut microbiome or genome.

The truth is, even a deeply personalized nutrition plan can only help so much as the individual is willing and able to follow it.

Access to a variety of fresh foods, time to prepare and consume healthy meals, personal stress level and sleep quantity can also impact how well personalized nutrition works from one person to the next.

  1. Personalized nutrition is highly likely to improve energy levels and life quality.

As the DSM (Diagnostic Standards Manual) explains, new research in hospital nutrition clearly showed that patients who worked with a personal dietitian got better nutrition than patients that ate standard hospital fare.

Whether you are recovering from a serious illness, injury or procedure or simply want to boost your overall daily energy level and wellbeing, this study points to the efficacy of using personalized nutrition to achieve these goals.

  1. Personalized nutrition can close the gap between what is known and what you think you know about your own nutritional needs.

As the Food Policy Journal points out, many people think they know more than they actually do about how best to meet their body’s dietary needs.

With personalized nutrition, people have the opportunity to learn what they don’t realize they don’t know about their own nutritional imbalances.

  1. Having clear goals can improve the outcome of personalized nutrition.

Similarly, if you have a very clear idea of the health outcomes you hope to gain by seeking a personalized nutrition plan, the plan is more likely to work in your favor.

As the research studies mentioned here earlier highlight, research participants were identified based on shared genome, specific health or dietary concerns or medical status, which allowed researchers to measure outcomes related to diet specifically.

For example, if you want to have more energy, slim down, improve athletic endurance or speed up healing time, these types of clear goals can enhance the outcome of your personalized nutrition plan.

With these six facts in hand, you can identify your top health, wellness, fitness and weight management goals. This, in turn, will help you work with a personalized nutrition provider to create a dietary plan to achieve these goals.

Heather Breese
Heather Breese is a qualified writer who fell in love with creativity and became a specialist creator and writer, focused on readers and market need.

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